• The Melrose Jazz Club
  • Bob Bland
  • Drama No Agent Scouted Available
  • 77.7
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Details
Manager The Robb Company (Sherry Robb)
Loglines
Facing a devastating diagnosis of MS, a brilliant, ambitious jazz pianist must look for a supplemental player for his band if he stands any chance of beating his ex-best friend and arch rival at an upcoming jazz competition.  He unexpectedly meets a similarly talented, shyly pugnacious young waitress with a history of domestic abuse and takes her under his wing, teaching her jazz all while falling in love with her.
Facing a debilitating diagnosis of MS, a brilliant and ambitious jazz pianist takes a similarly talented but shy young woman with a history of domestic abuse under his wing, teaching her jazz all while falling in love with her.
A talented jazz pianist diagnosed with MS is forced to look for a fill-in pianist while keeping his illness from his band. A young woman on the run from an abusive husband has strong potential to be the player he seeks, but her fears and hesitations and his secrets stand in the way of them working together.
A young jazz pianist is diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and must look for a supplemental player for his band if he stands any chance of beating his ex-best friend and rival musician at an upcoming jazz competition. When he unexpectedly comes across a talented self-taught pianist working as a waitress, she’s reluctant to join his band, scared of the abusive husband from whom she fled, so the pianist attempts to sway her through lessons and writing sessions that eventually develop into a romance.
Format
Genres
Drama, Music, Romance, Behind The Scenes, Boyfriend/Girlfriend, Competition, Divorce, Feel Good/Uplifting, Heartwarming, Relationship, Rivalry
Pages
113
Rated
PG-13
Budget
Low
Lead
M Other 33 Attractive
Similar
La La Land, Born To Be Blue, Rules Don't Apply, Walk the Line
When
2000/ Several Months.
Where
100% Los Angeles including a diner, several jazz clubs, a hospital, a doctor's office, several homes and apartments, a motel, a courtroom, several cars, and various city streets

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Synopsis
GEORGE (33), a talented but struggling jazz pianist experiences tensions over writing credits with his bandmate, the morally dubious and unapologetic SPEEDY (34). After George realizes that Speedy has sabotaged his chances for a showcase at the Kennedy center, he confides in his other bandmate BYRD (30’s) and their fried RITA (37), a waitress at the diner where they hang out.

Meanwhile, JAMES (30’s) hits his wife FRANCINE (24) for the last time because she packs up and escapes as he destroys her beloved piano. At a performance contest, George and Speedy’s group wins, but Speedy is not happy with being upstaged by George. George and Byrd quit and vow to form their own group, and to win a big contest next year that could give them their big break. As they practice, George starts to experience strange cramps in his hands. The group learns that Speedy owns the legal rights to all the music they once wrote together.

Francine ends up at the diner and the instantly friendly Rita gives her a job as a waitress. George continues to mess up due to pain in his hands. Byrd urges him to see a doctor and George resists. George sees Francine in...
Reader 1 Comments
OVERALL (RECOMMEND)
“The Melrose Jazz Club,” a drama about a brilliant jazz musician who, after being diagnosed with debilitating MS, must put his faith in an untrained yet talented female musician to win the biggest prize of all, works incredibly well throughout, owing to its exceptionally well-done and layered conflicts, its strong structure, and its endearing and interesting characters. The jazzy tone and fast-paced dialogue serve as the cherry on top. Despite some pacing struggles in the second act, “The Melrose Jazz Club” ultimately stands out as both wonderfully entertaining and deeply emotional....
Reader 2 Comments
OVERALL (CONSIDER)
This romantic drama about a musician with MS who gradually falls in love with the player he chooses to replace him features a compelling premise and a goal oriented character with varied sources of conflict opposing his actions. A specific world feels to be rendered authentically, and the theme of love of music carries the piece well. However, a subplot that features the chief antagonist still feels underdeveloped and lacking payoff that stands to involve all the characters, which factors into tone and leaves some unanswered logistical questions. The protagonist’s arc still could use some work in terms of overcoming major flaws, for which there are a couple of interesting candidates. Overall there are more strengths here than weaknesses, and what the narrative could likely use most is a committed emboldening and expanding of its promising beats, and not necessarily a refocusing or reworking of basic sources of character, conflict, and tone....
Reader 3 Comments
OVERALL (CONSIDER)
“The Melrose Jazz Club” is a musical drama about a young jazz pianist who is diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, and finds an unlikely new collaborator in a young woman running from an abusive marriage. A dual protagonist approach is nonetheless successful in delivering clear and satisfying arcs for both characters thanks to a strict focus on their relationship. Each characters’ respective internal conflicts make up most of the narrative’s tension, and while the prevailing tone is one of the narrative’s defining elements, it allows for a somewhat low level of immediate, scene-to-scene conflict. Dialogue between the main pair is a standout, and the writing helps immerse the reader in the musical, magical world of the narrative. Ongoing efforts towards revision are clear, and are shaping up to create a meaningful and uplifting drama....